When Drones Go Wrong

People have been talking a lot about drones more and more, the good and the bad. Often when people talk of what can go wrong with drones, it naturally concerns physical dangers like crashing, or hitting another aircraft, much like the near-collision between a commercial airliner and a private drone.

Now, another mishap took place, not outdoors, but in an indoor party – and one person got hurt in that incident. A New York party-goer has spoken of his shock after being hit by a drone at a hi-tech ‘home of the future’ party. Publisher Stephen Kosloff tweeted shocking images from the party, organised by gadget website Gizmodo, of his blood-stained t-shirt after an out of control drone hit him in the head. Read more at

In one write-up on what can possibly go wrong with drones, some problems were noted: While initially cheaper than manned planes, unmanned drones of the sort used now tend to require many more personnel: 168 people to keep a Predator drone in the air for 24 hours, plus 19 analysts to process the videos created by a drone.  Drones and their related technologies are increasing in price rapidly.  And to make matters worse, they tend to crash.  They even “go rogue,” lose contact with their “pilots” and fly off on their own.  The U.S. Navy has a drone that self-destructs if you accidentally touch the space bar on the computer keyboard.  Drones also tend to supply so-called enemies with information, including the endless hours of video they record, and to infect U.S. military computers with viruses. Read more here

New research is looking to develop solutions that some of the most common problems drones could face, such as navigating urban environments and performing novel tasks. These solutions could come based on the work of 14 distinguished research teams, who are investigating how mechanisms adopted by birds, bats, insects and other creatures can be used to solve real-world problems for the next generation of drones.

This innovative work has been published in a special edition of IOP Publishing’s journal Bioinspiration and Biomimetrics.
Read more at http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1113153905/drones-of-future-inspired-by-animal-evolution-052314/#eT5OQ0RhMpV1kxzX.99

New research is looking to develop solutions that some of the most common problems drones could face, such as navigating urban environments and performing novel tasks. These solutions could come based on the work of 14 distinguished research teams, who are investigating how mechanisms adopted by birds, bats, insects and other creatures can be used to solve real-world problems for the next generation of drones.

This innovative work has been published in a special edition of IOP Publishing’s journal Bioinspiration and Biomimetrics.
Read more at http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1113153905/drones-of-future-inspired-by-animal-evolution-052314/#eT5OQ0RhMpV1kxzX.99

New research is looking to develop solutions that some of the most common problems drones could face, such as navigating urban environments and performing novel tasks. These solutions could come based on the work of 14 distinguished research teams, who are investigating how mechanisms adopted by birds, bats, insects and other creatures can be used to solve real-world problems for the next generation of drones. Read more at 

 

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